NSFW / 18+ / USA / Tennessee / Taken / 28 / Bisexual / Geek / Potterhead / Whovian / Browncoat / Gamer / Fat / Student / Artist / Music & Movie Lover / Amateur Photographer / Future Teacher / Aspiring Anthropologist

Elsewhere: facebook / deviantArt / pinterest

cordeliafoxxofficial:

image

You can’t escape followers, i’ve already glued the door shut

image

Nice try followers, but I replaced all the glass with rubber.

image

Too late followers, I’ve already cloooggged all the toooiiiiillleeeetttts

(Source: corpish)

(Source: twitter.com)

marilynmortuary:

revin68:

Betty Brosmer - yes, that’s her actual waist. >=)

No corset training either. Amazing.

marilynmortuary:

revin68:

Betty Brosmer - yes, that’s her actual waist. >=)

No corset training either. Amazing.

Mark Sheppard - The Man Who Made it Into Nearly Every Fandom

totally-randomfandom:

giandujakiss:

thewestcoastkid:

atleastimnotbrentspiner:

millyzoreen:

winny-chester-the-pooh:

Badger in Fireflyimage

Canton Delaware in Doctor Who

image

Arnon in Charmed

image

 Crowley in SupernaturalimageBenedict Valare in Warehouse 13

imageAnd Graham Tanaka in Dollhouse

imageWHY IS THIS MAN NOT KING OF TUMBLR????

image

Don’t forget Romo Lampkin in Battlestar Galactica!

are we not going to talk about star trek

image

And The Director of The Ring from Chuck

image

Duh, X-Files?  How quickly they forget.

image

Don’t forget Monk

imageimage

image

image

lovelymuse:

flordemilraices:

black-american-queen:

black-american-queen:

euthanizeallwhitepeople:

jcoleknowsbest:

neoamericana:

nezua:

asustainablefuture:

A Selk’nam couple with their baby, on a ship en route to be exhibited in Europe as “wildmen”. The Selk’nam people are an indigenous tribe in the Patagonian region of Southern Argentina and Chile. Both appear to have slight damage on their ankles from cruel, probably iron, restraints. 
The fear and confusion on their face is haunting. For people who had lived a simple hunting and gathering lifestyle, with little European interaction, the rest of their lives must’ve seemed like a surreal nightmare. 

White History

Abducted by aliens.

Smh

White history

I really want to know who these people are/what happened to them

SO I DID A BIT OF DIGGING AND HOLY SHIT. THE SELK’HAM PEOPLE WERE WIPED OUT IN A MASS GENOCIDE.
LIKE… THEY ARE NO MORE. THE DESCENDENTS OF THIS COUPLE DO NOT EXIST.
AN ENTIRE LANGUAGE. AN ENTIRE CUISINE. AN ENTIRE WAY OF LIFE. WIPED AWAY.
YA’LL WANT SOME FUCKING WHITE HISTORY MONTH? HERE IS SOME GOD DAMN WHITE HISTORY FOR YOU TO PUT NEXT TO ALL THOSE SHINNY IMAGES OF THESE WHITE MEN WHO “DISCOVERED THE WORLD”.
HANG THIS IMAGE IN ALL THE DAMN CLASSROOMS. I’M DONE.

WHITE HISTORY

This is horrid

lovelymuse:

flordemilraices:

black-american-queen:

black-american-queen:

euthanizeallwhitepeople:

jcoleknowsbest:

neoamericana:

nezua:

asustainablefuture:

A Selk’nam couple with their baby, on a ship en route to be exhibited in Europe as “wildmen”. The Selk’nam people are an indigenous tribe in the Patagonian region of Southern Argentina and Chile. Both appear to have slight damage on their ankles from cruel, probably iron, restraints.

The fear and confusion on their face is haunting. For people who had lived a simple hunting and gathering lifestyle, with little European interaction, the rest of their lives must’ve seemed like a surreal nightmare. 

White History

Abducted by aliens.

Smh

White history

I really want to know who these people are/what happened to them

SO I DID A BIT OF DIGGING AND HOLY SHIT. THE SELK’HAM PEOPLE WERE WIPED OUT IN A MASS GENOCIDE.

LIKE… THEY ARE NO MORE. THE DESCENDENTS OF THIS COUPLE DO NOT EXIST.

AN ENTIRE LANGUAGE. AN ENTIRE CUISINE. AN ENTIRE WAY OF LIFE. WIPED AWAY.

YA’LL WANT SOME FUCKING WHITE HISTORY MONTH? HERE IS SOME GOD DAMN WHITE HISTORY FOR YOU TO PUT NEXT TO ALL THOSE SHINNY IMAGES OF THESE WHITE MEN WHO “DISCOVERED THE WORLD”.

HANG THIS IMAGE IN ALL THE DAMN CLASSROOMS. I’M DONE.

WHITE HISTORY

This is horrid

(Source: lannisteress)

neurosciencestuff:

Why Wet Feels Wet: Understanding the Illusion of Wetness
Human sensitivity to wetness plays a role in many aspects of daily life. Whether feeling humidity, sweat or a damp towel, we often encounter stimuli that feel wet. Though it seems simple, feeling that something is wet is quite a feat because our skin does not have receptors that sense wetness. The concept of wetness, in fact, may be more of a “perceptual illusion” that our brain evokes based on our prior experiences with stimuli that we have learned are wet.
So how would a person know if he has sat on a wet seat or walked through a puddle? Researchers at Loughborough University and Oxylane Research proposed that wetness perception is intertwined with our ability to sense cold temperature and tactile sensations such as pressure and texture. They also observed the role of A-nerve fibers—sensory nerves that carry temperature and tactile information from the skin to the brain—and the effect of reduced nerve activity on wetness perception. Lastly, they hypothesized that because hairy skin is more sensitive to thermal stimuli, it would be more perceptive to wetness than glabrous skin (e.g., palms of the hands, soles of the feet), which is more sensitive to tactile stimuli.
Davide Filingeri et al. exposed 13 healthy male college students to warm, neutral and cold wet stimuli. They tested sites on the subjects’ forearms (hairy skin) and fingertips (glabrous skin). The researchers also performed the wet stimulus test with and without a nerve block. The nerve block was achieved by using an inflatable compression (blood pressure) cuff to attain enough pressure to dampen A-nerve sensitivity.
They found that wet perception increased as temperature decreased, meaning subjects were much more likely to sense cold wet stimuli than warm or neutral wet stimuli. The research team also found that the subjects were less sensitive to wetness when the A-nerve activity was blocked and that hairy skin is more sensitive to wetness than glabrous skin. These results contribute to the understanding of how humans interpret wetness and present a new model for how the brain processes this sensation.
“Based on a concept of perceptual learning and Bayesian perceptual inference, we developed the first neurophysiological model of cutaneous wetness sensitivity centered on the multisensory integration of cold-sensitive and mechanosensitive skin afferents,” the research team wrote. “Our results provide evidence for the existence of a specific information processing model that underpins the neural representation of a typical wet stimulus.”
The article “Why wet feels wet? A neurophysiological model of human cutaneous wetness sensitivity” is published in the Journal of Neurophysiology.
(Image credit)

neurosciencestuff:

Why Wet Feels Wet: Understanding the Illusion of Wetness

Human sensitivity to wetness plays a role in many aspects of daily life. Whether feeling humidity, sweat or a damp towel, we often encounter stimuli that feel wet. Though it seems simple, feeling that something is wet is quite a feat because our skin does not have receptors that sense wetness. The concept of wetness, in fact, may be more of a “perceptual illusion” that our brain evokes based on our prior experiences with stimuli that we have learned are wet.

So how would a person know if he has sat on a wet seat or walked through a puddle? Researchers at Loughborough University and Oxylane Research proposed that wetness perception is intertwined with our ability to sense cold temperature and tactile sensations such as pressure and texture. They also observed the role of A-nerve fibers—sensory nerves that carry temperature and tactile information from the skin to the brain—and the effect of reduced nerve activity on wetness perception. Lastly, they hypothesized that because hairy skin is more sensitive to thermal stimuli, it would be more perceptive to wetness than glabrous skin (e.g., palms of the hands, soles of the feet), which is more sensitive to tactile stimuli.

Davide Filingeri et al. exposed 13 healthy male college students to warm, neutral and cold wet stimuli. They tested sites on the subjects’ forearms (hairy skin) and fingertips (glabrous skin). The researchers also performed the wet stimulus test with and without a nerve block. The nerve block was achieved by using an inflatable compression (blood pressure) cuff to attain enough pressure to dampen A-nerve sensitivity.

They found that wet perception increased as temperature decreased, meaning subjects were much more likely to sense cold wet stimuli than warm or neutral wet stimuli. The research team also found that the subjects were less sensitive to wetness when the A-nerve activity was blocked and that hairy skin is more sensitive to wetness than glabrous skin. These results contribute to the understanding of how humans interpret wetness and present a new model for how the brain processes this sensation.

“Based on a concept of perceptual learning and Bayesian perceptual inference, we developed the first neurophysiological model of cutaneous wetness sensitivity centered on the multisensory integration of cold-sensitive and mechanosensitive skin afferents,” the research team wrote. “Our results provide evidence for the existence of a specific information processing model that underpins the neural representation of a typical wet stimulus.”

The article “Why wet feels wet? A neurophysiological model of human cutaneous wetness sensitivity” is published in the Journal of Neurophysiology.

(Image credit)

muslimrave:

one time a boy tried to pull my hijab off

i punched him in the face

closed fist, short swing, right in the jaw

there is a point where you stop trying to educate people and start making the consequences of their racist bullshit real fuckin clear.

lady-chub:

Forgot I had a garter belt and knee highs ;)))

x-sunnydragonfly-x:

cosplayblog:

Birthday Weeks | Gaming Week #5 (Aftermath Day):

Flemeth from Dragon Age II

Cosplayer: Mono Abel [TM | DA | TW | IN]
Photographer: Dzeta

goddess